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How To Reduce Indoor Pollution

By Nidhi Nangia. Updated: January 21, 2017
How To Reduce Indoor Pollution

Usually, we think of pollution as something related to the outside. Air pollution is available in the outside air in the form of haze, ozone and smog. But in reality, air indoors is also polluted, sometimes even more polluted than the outside air. There are several factors that may pollute your inside air, including lead, fire-retardants, volatile chemicals, formaldehyde, radon and others. Children, elderly, and people with breathing problems may have sensitivity to these indoor pollutants, while others may also develop health problems over time with repeated exposure. Here at OneHowTo.com, we will tell you how to reduce indoor pollution.

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Ventilate properly

Cleaning, cooking, nail polishing, using hair sprays and other such activities can release capricious compounds in your indoor air, which can ultimately lead to varied health related issues. To reduce indoor pollution, use proper house ventilation in the form of fans and hoods to reduce exposure and humidity causing mildew and mold. If you use a fireplace, ensure that its flue damper is open wide. Poor ventilation allows pollutants to linger in your inside air.

How To Reduce Indoor Pollution - Ventilate properly

Ban smoking indoors

According to experts, cigarette smoke is one of the most common factors that cause indoor air pollution. Cigarette smoke releases residual particles and gas, that settle down on your fabrics, carpets and tapestry, and cause health hazards to the family members. Children and people with chronic lung and heart problems have more chances of developing serious complications. So, don’t allow anyone to smoke inside your home.

How To Reduce Indoor Pollution - Ban smoking indoors

Get rid of household odors

Instead of masking household odors, try to find out its source, and eliminate them. These can be in the form of a rotten apple in the cupboard, a pet stool or a musty blanket. Find the source of the odor and clean it up. Some people use air fresheners to improve the smell of their house, but they contain phthalates and VOCs which are more harmful for the inside air. Use a bowl of baking soda instead, which will suck up the odors and make your inside air cleaner and fresher.

How To Reduce Indoor Pollution - Get rid of household odors

Mop regularly

Mopping the house regularly with a wet cloth picks up the dirt and dust that is usually left behind by vacuuming. There is no need to use cleaners and soaps. Just dip a cloth in plain water, and capture lingering allergens and dust from your surfaces. More advanced micro-fiber mops are designed to capture more dirt and dust than a traditional cloth mop.

How To Reduce Indoor Pollution - Mop regularly

Keep the shoes outside

Most people bring dirt and chemicals from the outside inside their home through their shoes. If possible, try to keep all shoes outside the house, and keep separate slippers for the inside. If that’s not possible, keep large door mats outside all your entry doors, so that the dirt, pollutants and pesticides on shoes do not enter inside the home. Even if people don’t wipe off their shoes properly with the door mat, it will at least reduce the amount of dirt coming inside.

How To Reduce Indoor Pollution - Keep the shoes outside

Get some plants

Your indoor air can become fresher and cleaner with plants like a spider plant, aloe vera or fern. These indoor plants act like natural air purifiers, as their roots and foliage absorb most of the chemical pollutants that your synthetic materials may release. For more information take a look at our article on how to grow healthy plants indoors.

How To Reduce Indoor Pollution - Get some plants

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